Showing posts tagged stress
When the turbulence of distracting thoughts subsides and our mind becomes still, a deep happiness and contentment naturally arise from within. This feeling of contentment and well-being helps us cope with the busyness and difficulties of daily life. So much of the stress and tension we normally experience comes from our mind, and many of the problems we experience, including poor health, are caused or aggravated by this stress. Just by doing breathing meditation for ten or fifteen minutes each day, we will be able to reduce this stress. We will experience a calm, spacious feeling in the mind, and many of our usual problems will disappear.
Geshe Kelsang Gyatso - “Introduction to Buddhism”
So much of the stress and tension we normally experience comes from our mind, and many of the problems we experience, including poor health, are caused or aggravated by this stress. Just by doing breathing meditation for ten or fifteen minutes each day, we will be able to reduce this stress. We will experience a calm, spacious feeling in the mind, and many of our usual problems will disappear.
Geshe Kelsang Gyatso - “Transform Your Life”

dharma-thoughts:

“If we learn to accept unavoidable suffering, unhappy thoughts will never arise to disturb us. There are many difficult and unpleasant circumstances that we cannot avoid, but we can certainly avoid the unhappiness and anger these circumstances normally provoke in us. It is these habitual reactions to hardship, rather than the hardship itself, that disturb our day-to-day peace of mind, as well as our spiritual practice. When we learn to accept difficult circumstances patiently, the real problem disappears. For example, suppose our body is afflicted by painful illness. If we have a way of accepting the pain - for instance, by seeing it as a means of exhausting negative karma - our mind will remain at peace even though our body is in pain. Moreover, since physical pain is closely related to the tension and stress in our mind, as our mind relaxes we may discover that the physical pain is closely related to the tension and stress in our mind, as our mind relaxes we may discover that the physical pain actually subsides and our body is able to heal itself. However, if we refuse to deal realistically with the discomfort, cursing our illness and letting ourself become depressed, then not only shall we have to endure the additional suffering of mental torment, but very probably our physical pain will increase as well.”

Geshe Kelsang Gyatso ~ How to Solve Our Human Problems 

(Reblogged from dharma-thoughts)

dharma-thoughts:

There are innumerable occasions on which it is easy to develop an unhappy mind……when we are lonely or can never find time to be alone, when we cannot find work or have too much work, when our dreams and wishes remains unfulfilled or, once fulfilled, leaves us feeling hollow and dissatisfied, when we fail or when our success brings with it more stress than we can bear, or when people we dislike are successful - the list is endless. In all these situations our unhappiness can easily lead to a feeling that life or other people are unfair to us, and this depresses us even more.

Instead of reacting blindly through the force of emotional habit, we should examine whether it is helpful or realistic to become unhappy in such situations. We do not need to become unhappy just because things do not go our way. Although, until now this has indeed been our reaction to difficulties, once we recognize that it does not work we are free to respond in more realistic and constructive way.

Geshe Kelsang Gyatso ~ How to Solve Our Human Problems 
(Tharpa Publications)

(Reblogged from dharma-thoughts)
(Reblogged from kadampalife)
Many of us are slaves to our minds. Our own mind is our worst enemy. We try to focus, and our mind wanders off. We try to keep stress at bay, but anxiety keeps us awake at night. We try to be good to the people we love, but then we forget them and put ourselves first. And when we want to change our life, we dive into spiritual practice and expect quick results, only to lose focus after the honeymoon has worn off. We return to our state of bewilderment. We’re left feeling helpless and discouraged. It seems we all agree that training the body through exercise, diet, and relaxation is a good idea, but why don’t we think about training our minds?
Sakyong Mipham (via journeytoenlightenment)
(Reblogged from babydali)