Showing posts tagged spiritual path
Vajrayana means, literally, ‘Vajra Vehicle.’ ‘Vajra’ refers to the non-duality of method and wisdom, and ‘Vehicle’ refers to a spiritual path. It is the quick path to enlightenment because by practicing Vajrayana we accumulate both the collection of merit and the collection of wisdom within one concentration on emptiness, and thus create simultaneously all the causes for the Form Body and the Truth Body of a Buddha. Because the collections of merit and wisdom are both accumulated within one concentration they are said to be indivisible, like a vajra. Such a practice of concentration is revealed only in the Vajrayana.
Geshe Kelsang Gyatso - “Joyful Path of Good Fortune”
If we wish to become enlightened in this very lifetime we need to enter the Vajrayana, or Tantric, path because only the Vajrayana teaches methods for attaining Buddhahood in one life. It is very rare to receive the teachings of Vajrayana; of the one thousand Buddhas of this Fortunate Aeon it is said that only three teach Vajrayana, and one of these is Buddha Shakyamuni.
Geshe Kelsang Gyatso - “Joyful Path of Good Fortune”

"With wisdom we can fulfill all our wishes."

Excerpt of a teaching given by Geshe Kelsang Gyatso at the Fall Festival in Portugal on why we need wisdom.

We can use all the difficulties that we see in the world as spiritual teachings that encourage us to develop renunciation, the wish to liberate ourself from the cycle of impure life; compassion, the wish that others may be liberated permanently from the cycle of impure life; and the wisdom that realizes that all these impurities are the results of our non-virtuous actions. In this way, through Lamrim practice we can transform all adverse conditions into opportunities for developing realizations of the spiritual path that will bring us pure and everlasting happiness.
Geshe Kelsang Gyatso - “Modern Buddhism”

bakukadampa:

Abundant Bull Moon on Protector Day

This full moon at the end of November brings the energy that leads to abundance & wealth. It’s Protector Day in our Buddhist tradition, traditionally known as Kangso.
All this felt very blessed.

New post on Cosmic Loti :)

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(Reblogged from bakukadampa)

Developing Bodhichitta: Sevenfold Cause and Effect

There are two methods for training the mind in bodhichitta: training the mind in the sevenfold cause and effect, and training the mind in equalizing and exchanging self with others. In the method of training the mind in the sevenfold cause and effect, we train ourselves to hold others as dear to us as our mother. This method has eight steps; the first step is a preparation, the next six are meditations to generate causes of bodhichitta, and the last stage is the attainment of bodhichitta. The eight stages of the sevenfold cause and effect are:

1) Developing equanimity. This is a meditation practicing on balancing our attitudes and feelings towards three groups of people we encounter: those we like and have an attachment to them, those we don’t like and have an aversion to them, and those we feel neither attachment nor aversion towards them. We contemplate how those we dislike now were our friends in this or past lives, how those we have a strong attachment to now were our enemies in this or past lives, and how those we are neutral towards have been both our friends and enemies in the past. Relationships and our attitudes towards others are impermanent and always changing and everyone has been both friend and enemy to us at some point. Understanding this, we make the determination to regard all people with the same balanced attitude, feeling neither attachment nor aversion to anyone.

2) Recognizing that all living beings are our mothers. Because our births have been countless, so we have had countless mothers. All these past mothers are the various living beings here with us today.

3) Remembering the kindness of all mother beings. We start by remembering the kindness of our mother of this life. Without her, we wouldn’t be here. We can remember all the kind things our mother has done for us, from giving birth to us to taking care of us, and every other way we can think of. Then we remember that all our mothers from our previous lives did the same.

4) Developing the wish to repay the kindness of all mother beings. It is natural to want to repay any kindness we have received once we recognize that kindness. We contemplate the best method for repaying our mothers’ kindness, and come to the conclusion that the best way to repay her kindness is to give her permanent liberation from samsara and make the determination to do this.

5) Developing affectionate love. Affectionate love is feeling close to someone and holding them dear to us. If we have affectionate love for all beings it is impossible to develop jealousy and anger toward them. From affectionate love develops cherishing love (caring for others’ well-being), and from cherishing love develops wishing love - the love that wishes all other beings to be happy. When we develop wishing love, we naturally develop great compassion at the same time.

6) Developing great compassion. Great compassion is a mind that wishes all beings to be free from suffering. We need to cultivate great compassion to enter the Mahayana paths. Enlightenment is only possible with great compassion. The sign that we have realized great compassion is that whenever we see another living being we have the spontaneous wish for them to be free from their sufferings.

7) Developing superior intention. Superior intention is the promise we make to personally liberate all beings from suffering in samsara. Just wishing for beings to be released from suffering is not enough; we are determined to do something about it. Superior intention is a firm decision and a commitment to free others from suffering.

8) Developing bodhichitta. Bodhichitta is a spontaneous wish, motivated by great compassion, to attain enlightenment to benefit all living beings. The sign that we have realized bodhichitta is that we never lose this thought. When we realize bodhichitta, we have entered the Mahayana path.

bakukadampa:

dancingdakini

“If we integrate Buddha’s teachings into our daily life, we will be able to solve all our inner problems and attain a truly peaceful mind. Without inner peace, outer peace is impossible. If we first establish peace within our minds by training in spiritual paths, outer peace will come naturally; but if we do not, world peace will never be achieved, no matter how many people campaign for it.”—Geshe Kelsang Gyatso - “Introduction to Buddhism”


wow, the number of likes…people really like this one!

bakukadampa:

If we integrate Buddha’s teachings into our daily life, we will be able to solve all our inner problems and attain a truly peaceful mind. Without inner peace, outer peace is impossible. If we first establish peace within our minds by training in spiritual paths, outer peace will come naturally; but if we do not, world peace will never be achieved, no matter how many people campaign for it.”—Geshe Kelsang Gyatso - “Introduction to Buddhism”

wow, the number of likes…people really like this one!

(Reblogged from bakukadampa)