Showing posts tagged moral discipline
(Reblogged from self-assassin)

Eleven ways of helping others

1) alleviating the suffering of others and offering assistance in their work

2) teaching worldly or spiritual skills to others

3) returning the kindness we have received

4) removing dangers that threaten others and eliminating the causes of fear

5) consoling others when they are in grief

6) giving material assistance to the poor

7) helping those who experience problems that come when they have anger or desirous attachment

8) helping others in a way that is appropriate to their own views and customs. We need to offer help in a way that is relevant to the them that they can accept, without attacking their beliefs or views.

9) encouraging those who have entered correct spiritual paths and helping them continue their practice

10) helping those who have entered wrong paths and mistaken views to enter correct spiritual paths.

11) helping others by using whatever miracle powers we possess.

The perfection of moral discipline

Moral discipline is a virtuous mental determination to abandon any fault, or it is a bodily or verbal action motivated by such a determination. Moral discipline practiced with bodhichitta motivation is the perfection of moral discipline. There are three types of moral discipline:

1) the moral discipline of restraint - abstaining from negative physical, verbal, or mental actions

2) the moral discipline of gathering virtuous Dharmas - sincerely engaging in the practice of the six perfections and engaging in the ten Dharma activities of writing Dharma books, reading Dharma books, memorizing words of Dharma, reciting words of Dharma, making offerings to Dharma, giving Dharma books, explaining the meaning of Dharma, listening to Dharma, contemplating the meaning of Dharma, and meditating on the meaning of Dharma.

3) the moral discipline of benefiting living beings - helping others in whatever way we can. This can be practical help if we have the means to do so, or prayers for them if there is nothing practical that we can do.

kadampalife:

How to win friends and influence people (according to Buddhism)

Sometimes I think we approach moral discipline the wrong way around, thinking of all the things…

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Nice post on the practice of moral discipline and the Fall Festival in Portugal. Moral discipline is one of those topics a lot of people don’t want to hear or think about, especially if they came from a religion that pushed a lot of rules on it’s followers, but it’s really more than just a list of do’s and don’t’s.

(Reblogged from kadampalife)
To practice moral discipline means to abandon negative actions having understood their dangers. Although there are some negative actions that we cannot abandon immediately due to our strong negative habits of mind, there are some that we can definitely discontinue right now. We need to train our mind gently and steadily, first dealing with the non-virtuous actions we can abandon easily, and then gradually building up the determination, courage, and skill we need to eliminate even our most stubborn bad habits.
Geshe Kelsang Gyatso - “Joyful Path of Good Fortune”
With regard to any Dharma practice, if our concentration is clear and strong it is very easy to make progress. Normally, distraction is the main obstacle to our Dharma practice. The practice of moral discipline prevents gross distractions, and concentration prevents subtle distractions; together they give rise to quick results in our Dharma practice.
Geshe Kelsang Gyatso - “Modern Buddhism”
mindfulnessjournal:

For the Buddhist, the concept of moral discipline does not arise from superstitious subscription to the whims and laws of mythical gods and heavenly tyrants. It is not something that arises from fear. It is motivated by the generation of bodhicitta. 
The perfection of moral discipline is a proactive decision to abstain from non-virtuous actions, thoughts and conditions. The key to successfully engaging the practice involves mindfulness and awareness. The perfection is achieved by the threefold avoidance of non-virtuous actions, the discipline of keeping the Dharma and the discipline of performing acts which benefit others.

mindfulnessjournal:

For the Buddhist, the concept of moral discipline does not arise from superstitious subscription to the whims and laws of mythical gods and heavenly tyrants. It is not something that arises from fear. It is motivated by the generation of bodhicitta. 

The perfection of moral discipline is a proactive decision to abstain from non-virtuous actions, thoughts and conditions. The key to successfully engaging the practice involves mindfulness and awareness. The perfection is achieved by the threefold avoidance of non-virtuous actions, the discipline of keeping the Dharma and the discipline of performing acts which benefit others.

(Reblogged from mindfulnessjournal)
purpleaggregates:

“Once a man came unto me and denounced me on account of my observing the Way and practicing great loving- kindness. But I kept silent and did not answer him. The
denunciation ceased. Then I asked him. ‘If you bring a present to your neighbour and he accepts it not; does the present come back to you?’ He replied, ‘It will.’ I said, ‘You denounce me now, but as I accept it not, you must take the wrong deed back on your own person. It is like echo succeeding sound, it is like shadow following object; you never escape the effect of your own evil deeds. Be therefore mindful, and cease from doing evil.” ~ The Buddha

purpleaggregates:

“Once a man came unto me and
denounced me on account of my
observing the Way and practicing
great loving- kindness. But I kept
silent and did not answer him. The

denunciation ceased. Then I asked
him. ‘If you bring a present to your
neighbour and he accepts it not;
does the present come back to
you?’ He replied, ‘It will.’ I said,
‘You denounce me now, but as I
accept it not, you must take the
wrong deed back on your own
person. It is like echo succeeding
sound, it is like shadow following
object; you never escape the effect
of your own evil deeds. Be
therefore mindful, and cease from
doing evil.”

~ The Buddha
(Reblogged from purpleaggregates)