kadampapenny:

Sufferings are not given to us as punishment.  They all come from our self-cherishing mind, which wishes ourself to be happy while neglecting the happiness of others. - Geshe Kelsang Gyatso, The New Meditation Handbook

(Reblogged from kadampapenny)

Do not look for faults in others, but look for faults in yourself, and purge them like bad blood.

Do not contemplate your own good qualities, but contemplate the good qualities of others, and respect everyone as a servant would.

Atisha - “Advice from Atisha’s Heart”
Unfortunately we have become very skilled in recognizing the faults of others, and we devote a great deal of mental energy to listing them, analyzing them, and even meditating on them! With this critical attitude, if we disagree with our partner or colleagues about something, instead of trying to understand their point of view we repeatedly think of many reasons why we are right and they are wrong. By focusing exclusively on their faults and limitations we become angry and resentful, and rather than cherishing them we develop the wish to harm or discredit them. In this way small disagreements can easily turn into conflicts that simmer for months.
Geshe Kelsang Gyatso - “Eight Steps to Happiness”
We underestimate the value of patience. It is possible that people might sometimes interrupt our meditation sessions or Dharma study, but they can never take away our opportunity to train in inner virtues such as patience. It is this mental training, rather than outer virtuous activities, that is the essence of Dharma practice
Geshe Kelsang Gyatso ~ How to Solve Our Human Problem (via self-assassin)
(Reblogged from purpleaggregates)

jessicorvus:

“O Blessed One, Tathagata, Foe Destroyer, completely perfect Buddha, Medicine Guru, great king with the radiance of a lapis jewel, to you I prostrate, make offerings and go for refuge .” – Medicine Buddha Prayer

TAYATHA OM BEKHADZE BEKHADZE MAHA BEKHADZE BEKHADZE RANDZAYA SAMUGATE SOHA

(Reblogged from purpleaggregates)
The fact that we are oblivious to our faults does not prevent other people from noticing them and pointing them out, but when they do we feel that they are being unfair. Instead of looking honestly at our own behavior to see whether or not the criticism is justified, our self-cherishing mind becomes defensive and retaliates by finding fault with them.
Geshe Kelsang Gyatso - “Eight Steps to Happiness”
jessicorvus:

OM MUNI MUNI MAHA MUNIYE SOHA

jessicorvus:

OM MUNI MUNI MAHA MUNIYE SOHA

(Reblogged from jessicorvus)
Why do we regard ourself as so precious, but not others? It is because we are so familiar with self-cherishing. Since beginningless time we have grasped at a truly existent I. This grasping at I automatically gives rise to self-cherishing, which instinctively feels, “I am more important than others.” For ordinary beings, grasping at one’s own I and self-cherishing are like two sides of the same coin: I-grasping grasps at a truly existent I, while self-cherishing feels this I to be precious and cherishes it.
Geshe Kelsang Gyatso - “Eight Steps to Happiness”
kadampapenny:

Developing Equanimity.  Our first task, therefore, is to free our mind from these unbalanced attitudes and develop genuine equanimity - an equally warm and friendly attitude towards all living beings. - Geshe Kelsang Gyatso, The New Meditation Handbook

kadampapenny:

Developing Equanimity.  Our first task, therefore, is to free our mind from these unbalanced attitudes and develop genuine equanimity - an equally warm and friendly attitude towards all living beings. - Geshe Kelsang Gyatso, The New Meditation Handbook

(Reblogged from kadampapenny)

Recognizing our Faults in the Mirror of Dharma

For the most part, we don’t want to admit to or analyze our own faults. We tend to regard ourself as most important and develop an inflated view of ourself. This view can come from a variety of sources, such as our looks, our knowledge, our social status, skills, or experiences that we think are unique and special. We can develop pride on any of these things, or on qualities we only believe we actually possess.

It is so difficult for us to admit that we have faults that we resort to making excuses for them, oftentimes by finding others to blame instead of taking responsibility for our own shortcomings. But just because we can’t see our own faults doesn’t mean that others can’t see them, and when they criticize us our response is to usually become defensive and possibly retaliate. We, in turn, pay more attention to their faults and ignore their good qualities, and our mind becomes increasingly more disturbed and even angry the more we dwell on their perceived qualities.

As a result of regarding ourself as superior and others as inferior we perform many negative actions that will later ripen as rebirth in the lower realms. If we focus instead on the good qualities of others, our deluded pride will decrease and we will cherish others and view them as important. We will perform more kind and virtuous actions as a result of this positive view.